Translated News, Interviews, Blogs, and More From Japan's Other Side
Loading…

A Case for Mosaic, Revisited Part Two

My Dearest Desire Exclusive - Original Japanese Date: July 15th, 2015
English Translation Published: July 24th, 2015

Nobody be in it Japan nor abroad is a fan of the type of censorship required to produce Japanese AV domestically but will it be going away soon or...?

(Translator's note: This post is a continuation of a previous entry.)

 

Those who are familiar with Japanese AV know how much freer it is than western adult video. Rape, scat, and more are allowed. Things are getting slightly stricter now, but still most themes are fair play.  One AV company we work with told us they were blocked from calling a diaper-themed title “Akachan Unchi” (or “Baby Poop”), but when they changed the name to “Beibi Unchi” (or “Baby Poop”, again) the Ethics company they submit their work to gave them the green light.

 


RADIX's "Baby Poop" title.  Slight word play makes it OK for sale.
 

These ethics authorities are mainly staffed by retired police officers who now work 'easy jobs' in the private sector in a phenomenon called 'amakudari'. Not only are they very connected, their current livelihood is centered on ensuring proper mosaic placement in adult films. If there ever was a serious chance of the Japanese censorship law being repealed, hundreds of them will call in mass numbers of favors to ensure that the law remains unchanged until the end of time—or at least until their generation passes away.

Adding to this environment is the risk-averse nature of most Japanese AV production companies. The whole concept of producing your own content and mainly showing it on your own subscription-based paysite is still alien to most of them. Some do run their own sites, but success is rather muted compared to the west.

This can be both a positive and negative. It's a good thing because in Japan the most common way to consume AV is by purchasing one title at a time. New titles sell anywhere from 2000 to 10000 yen ($20 to $100USD) which is far more than what a western release would go for with very few exceptions. Thus, a release that sells reasonably well when it's still new can net a very nice profit.

What's more, distribution is something many production companies have little to worry about. All they have to do is work with a brick-and-mortar distribution network and perhaps ensure their titles appear on a few popular online destinations. If that's too much work, they can simply contact a content aggregator such as Mousouzoku AV who for a cut of the profits will essentially take care of everything.

 


Even foreign imports require mosaic to be added.

 

In this comfy environment, thinking out of the box is a risky endeavour. Incorporating abroad and producing uncensored is scary to most of these companies due to the legal hurdles it entails. None want to keep on adding titles with mosaic, but going 100% independent is something most will not risk.

It's very hard to imagine domestic Japanese going mosaic-free in the near future. The only thing AV companies can hope for is the dying out of the amakudari police officer Ethics generation and then pushing for the repeal of the law. As the internet becomes more globalized, there's always the chance we may see adventurous companies incorporate abroad and sell their content totally on their own uncensored, but as it stands now, the risk for most is simply too much.

Vote not counted Vote counted
ZENRA.net Subtitled Japanese AV

This post was brought to you by ZENRA.net | Subtitled Japanese AV

Comments are disabled for this article.

  • Goodbye Kitty said:

    It makes the guys dicks look bigger, so there's that.

    October 18th, 2015 - Reply

Categories

Contact Us or visit FAQ

Captcha image

Our Friends

Featured Articles

MDD Logo

My Dearest Desire features material created by and for adults. You agree that you are of legal adult age (18 or 21 in certain jurisdictions) and it is legal in your place of residence to view such material. You agree not to distribute and/or show in any way said material to anyone under the legal adult age (18 or 21 in certain jurisdictions).